Cycling Center Dallas Blog
Cycling Center Dallas Blog
Here we talk about all things cycling - training, wattage, group rides, bike rallies, triathlons, weather, coaching, coaches, nutrition, ponderings, musings, and equipment! If you have a topic or a question, send us a note and we'll try to answer for you!
(17) #aeroiseverything (1) #bikemart (1) #CCD (1) #CoachWharton (1) #computrainer (1) #computraining (1) #CycleDallas (1) #cycling (1) #CyclingCenterDallas (3) #cyclingclass (1) #ftdavis (1) #iambikemart (1) #iamrbm (1) #knowyournumbers (2) #leavewithnothingleft (5) #numbersdontlie (2) #trainwithpower (1) % Gain (9) % improvement (9) 15 seconds (2) 2010 (3) 60-60's (3) 75080 (4) 75218 (3) 75228 (2) 75240 (1) 75248 (1) AC (1) action = reaction (1) Adapting to Altitude (1) aero helmet (1) aerobic power (1) aerodynamics (1) Aledo (1) Aledo Ride for Heroes (1) Alexis Penn (1) Almond Milk (2) Alpe d'Huez (1) Alpine Texas (1) Anaerobic Conditioning (7) Anaerobic Work Capacity (3) Ardmore (1) Armando Mastracci (1) Athlete Update (8) AWC (2) bands (1) Baron Biosystems (2) Beat the heat (1) Best Bike Fit (1) bicycle (7) Bicycle Aerodynamics (1) Bicycle Coach (1) Bicycle Education (2) Bicycle Fit (1) Bicycle Rally (2) Bicycle-Stuff (1) bicycle-stuff.com (1) Bicycles (3) bicycling (19) Bike (3) bike adventures (1) Bike Coach (19) Bike Coach Dallas (1) Bike Critic (1) Bike Mart (6) Bike Rally (2) Bike Rally Results (4) Bike Ride (2) bike score (1) bike tire pressure (1) Bike travel (1) BikeMart (4) BikeMS (2) Biking (2) bone heath (1) Bonk Breakers (1) Brian Terrell (1) Buddy Training (5) Cadence (3) Calibrating a CompuTrainer (1) Cambridge (1) Cambridge Triathlon (1) Camelback (1) Camelbak (2) Camp (1) Campagnolo (1) Campbell Road (1) cancellation (1) cardio (1) Casa Linda (1) CCD (2) Cervelo (2) Changing Gears (1) Classes (9) climbing (1) Coach Christenson (1) Coach Craig Fulk (1) Coach Kurt (5) Coach RIchard Wharton (13) Coach Tracy Christenson (1) Coach Wharton (56) coaches (1) coaching (1) Coit Road (1) Coldblack (2) collarbone (1) CompuTrainer (28) CompuTrainer Calibration (1) Connect IQ (1) Core cycling (1) Core function (1) Core stability (1) Core Training (1) Cornering (1) Cornering on a bike (1) Craig Fulk (3) cramping (1) Crit Simulations (1) Critical Power (4) Critical Power Testing (1) Cycle Dallas (4) cycling (53) cycling adventures (1) Cycling and Resistance Training (7) Cycling and Technology (1) Cycling Cadence (1) Cycling Center Dallas (81) Cycling Center of Dallas (2) Cycling Challenge (1) Cycling Class (2) Cycling Coach (16) Cycling Dallas (2) Cycling dehydration (1) Cycling energy management (1) Cycling Equipment recommendations (1) Cycling Fatigue (1) Cycling Hydration (1) Cycling In Dallas (2) Cycling Monk (1) Cycling Posture (6) Cycling Posture Analysis (1) Cycling Power (1) Cycling Power Lab (1) cycling recovery (2) cycling rehydration (1) cycling resistance training (1) cycling rpm (1) Cycling Savvy (2) Cycling Scoliosis (1) Cycling Tips (16) cycling training (2) Cycling Zen (1) CyclingPowerLab.com (1) CyclingSavvy (2) Cyclist Education (1) Dallas (2) Dallas Bike Coach (1) Dallas Bike Coach. (1) Dallas Cycling (4) Dallas Cycling Center (1) Dan Driscoll (1) David Lopez (1) David Rothgeb (1) David Tilbury-Davis (1) Dean Markham (1) Descending (1) Detailed video (1) Dex Tooke (1) Dorothy Zarbo (1) Drew Hartman (1) Dynamic Bike Fit (2) Earbuds (1) Earbuds While Cycling (1) Emily Penn (1) Energy (1) ErgVideo (12) faster (1) fitness (10) flexibility (1) Friedrich's Ataxia (1) Frisco Cycling Club (1) Ft. Davis (2) FTP (3) Functional Movement (1) Functional Threshold Power (3) Garland Road (2) Garmin (1) Garmin 1000 (1) getting fit (1) Glen Rose (1) Goal Setting (1) Greater Dallas Bicyclists (1) Group Rides (1) Hammerfest (2) Heat (1) HH100 (1) Hills (1) Hip pain and cycling (1) Holistic Training (1) Hotter 'n Hell (1) Hotter 'n Hell Hundred (1) How to Calibrate a CompuTrainer (1) Hydration (3) ice back (1) IF (Intensity Factor) (3) improving power (1) in home (2) Incline (1) Incline Training (1) indoor cycling (2) Intensity (1) intervals (12) Jack Mott (1) Justine Viera (5) KiloJoules (2) Kiwanis (1) KookaBurra Bird Shop (2) Kurt Chacon (4) Kyle Keeter (1) Kyphosis (1) Lajitas (1) Lancaster (2) Lancaster Rally (2) Lane Control (1) Lane positioning (1) Le Tour (1) Leave With Nothing Left (3) LeaveWithNothingLeft (2) long climbs (1) Long Rides (1) Lordosis (1) losing weight (1) Louis Garneau (1) make up classes (1) Make-Up Class (1) Matrix (3) Maximal Power Available (1) Maximum Power Available (1) Meso-Cycle (1) Mesocycle (1) Michelle Beckley (1) mineral wells (1) Mirage (3) Mitochondria (1) mobility (1) Morphology (1) Moxy (7) Moxy Monitor (4) Moxy Muscle Oxygen Sensor (1) Moxy Sensor (1) MS150 (2) Mt. Locke (1) Muenster Rally (1) MultiRider (9) Muscle Oxygen (1) Muscle Oxygen Saturation (1) NBS Nutrition (1) Newton (1) Newton's Third Law (1) No Country for Old Men (1) north texas (1) North Texas Cycling (1) Nutrition (2) Nutrition Coach (1) OBC (1) Oklahoma (1) Oklahoma Cycling (1) Online Bike Coach (18) Online Coaching (1) Onlinebikecoach (1) Optimal Chainring Position (1) Osmo (3) Osmo Acute Recovery (1) Osmo Nutrition (2) osteopenia (1) osteoporosis (2) PACC (1) Paluxy Pedal (2) Parable (1) Paul Brown (1) Paul Smeulders (6) Pavel Kolar (1) Pedal Stroke (1) Pedal Stroke Analysis (2) Pedaling with one leg (1) Performance Cycling Instruction (12) PerfPro (14) PerfPro Analyzer (3) PerfPro Studio (11) Periodization (5) PerPro Studio (1) Personal Training (16) Plano Bicycling Association (2) Plano Cycling (1) post-ride recovery (1) Postural Analysis (1) Postural Assessment Cycling (1) posture (1) Posture Analysis (1) Posture Analysis Cycling (1) power (4) Power Meter (4) Power2Max (2) powertap (1) Pre-Season (3) Preparation for Elevation (1) Progression (6) Proper Bike Fit (1) Proper Warm Up (1) Q Ring (1) Q Rings (1) Quarq (3) Quarter (4) QXL (1) QXL Ring (1) RaceDay (1) RaceDay Analyzer (1) RaceDay Apollo (2) RacerMate (1) RBM (1) Reagent Strips (1) recovery (4) recumbent tricycle (1) Red Zone Fitness (1) redzonefitness (1) Relative Power (2) Resistance Training (6) resistance training and cycling (1) Resistance Training for Cyclists (1) Resmed S+ (1) Retul (2) Retul Muve (1) Richard Wharton (59) Richardson (6) Richardson Bike Mart (8) richardson location (1) Ride With GPS (1) RideWithGPS (2) ridewithgps.com (1) Riding in Dallas (1) Riding in Texas (1) Riding in the wind (1) rip trainer (1) RM1 (1) Rotor (1) Rotor Componentes Rotor 2InPower (1) Rotor Components (1) Rotor InPower (1) Rotor Power Meter (1) Rotor USA (1) RRC (1) Saturated Muscle Oxygen (2) Saturated Muscle Oxygen at Altitude (1) Scheduling (8) Shimano (1) Shindo Salvo (1) Skiba (2) Skiba Scores (1) Skill (1) Sleep Quality (1) Slope (1) SMART acronym (1) SmO2 (4) Somervell County (1) Specialized (1) Speed (1) SPIN (1) Spin Scan (1) SpinScan (1) Sprint Intervals (2) Sprinting (1) Sprints (1) SRAM (1) SRM (1) Stacy Sims (2) Stamina (1) Steve Elliott (1) Strength (1) strength training (6) stress (1) stretching (1) summer (1) summer heat (1) Suspension Training (3) Terlingua (1) Texas (2) Texas Cycling (1) Texas Heat (1) Texas Time Trials (1) ThB (3) Threshold (4) Threshold Power (8) Threshold Test (5) Threshold Wattage (1) Time Trial (1) Tin Butt (1) Tips (1) Tips for Cycling (2) Tire Pressure (1) Tom Anhalt (1) Total Hemoglobin (3) Tour de France (9) Tracy Christenson (8) train with power (2) Training (17) training peaks (1) training stress (1) Training With Critical Power (1) Training With Power (6) Training With W' (1) Training with wattage (6) Training with watts (3) Travel (1) travel fitness (1) Trek (1) triathlete (1) Triathlon (3) Triathlon training (1) Tricycle (1) TRX (7) TSS (1) TXBRA (1) Ultra Cycling (2) UMCA (1) Urban Cycling (1) USA Cycling (1) Vo2 (1) vo2 max (1) Vo2Max (9) W Prime (1) W' (2) wahoo kickr (1) Warming Up (1) Warmup (1) watt meter (1) wattage (30) Wattage Training (26) Watts (16) Watts per Kilogram (2) Weather (5) weight loss (4) weight training (1) weight training for cyclists (1) Wharton (3) White Rock Lake (2) Women's Coaching (1) Women's Racing (1) Women's Road Racing (1) Workout Description (10) Workout Review (10) workouts (2) Wunderground.com (1) Xert (4) Xert Online (2) Xertonline (2) YMCA (1) YouTube (1) Zen Cycling (1) Zone 4 (1) Zone 6 (1) Zone 7 (1)
whareagle
17:48

Thank you Semipro Cycling!!!

resized group image http://semiprocycling.com/indoor-group-training-richard-wharton

Tags:
cyclingcenterdallas
11:54

Lancaster Rally and A Ride With Emily Penn - Mission Accomplished!

This past weekend was a busy one, with a number of Cycling Center Dallas patrons enjoying the perfect Spring weather, and riding their bikes - mostly out at the Lancaster Bike Rally, hosted by the Greater Dallas Bicyclists. Per a previous arrangement, I made plans to head South of Dallas, just off of I-20, to meet up with one of my favorite clients, and escort her on an adventure. Read More

Tags:
cyclingcenterdallas
13:34

The Holistic Approach to Cycling Performance, Part I - Posture Analysis

When I started coaching twenty years ago, I was privileged to begin at a time when what we knew about performance, and what we didn't know about performance regarding cycling, left a wide gap of knowledge that needed to be filled. Fortunately, in 1996 and 1997, I returned to Dallas, where I hired a Personal Trainer, so that I could become a better mountain biker. Coach Kurt Chacon helped me understand that just because I was skinny and had a high metabolism, it did not mean I was going to be a stronger mountain biker. Texas Mountain Biking required a LOT of upper body muscular endurance and core strengthening, and over six months, Coach Kurt helped me gain about 5 lbs of muscle, which aided me towards getting several Top 10 finishes in my category in TMBRA. We forged a friendship that has now led to Coach Kurt becoming one of the Coaching Professionals at Cycling Center Dallas! This post is going to expand upon the synopsis above - in order to improve ALL of your cycling demands, you have to focus on ALL of the Physiological Requirements, and it ALL begins by assessing your body's composition and physical structure. Recently, Coach Kurt performed one of the first assessments in our newly opened Richardson Studio. The gentleman undergoing the examination was in his 60's, had about 8 years of consistent cycling experience, and had reached a plateau that he wanted to surpass. Coach Kurt followed this protocol to determine what this rider's core strengths and weaknesses were on a biomechanical level. The assessment began with the rider standing upright against a solid-colored wall, beside a plumb line. Upon observation, it became immediately noticeable that this cyclist had serious postural deviations from normal populations. Posture ALWAYS begins at the feet. The plumb line is spotted roughly between the heels. Image The plumb line should ideally run through the umbilicus, bisect the sternum, chin, nose and forehead. From the waist down, you can see an immediate offset between left and right. The left foot is closer to the median, and upon discussion, Coach Kurt learned that this rider placed all his weight on his left leg. Looking further up, he determined muscular differences, and upon further discussion, Coach Kurt learned that he had broken his right hip and had it pinned back together. Favoring one leg over another had led to pain and chronic arthritis in the left knee. ImageMoving up from the pelvis, the photograph reveals a torso that is shifted to the left. The right hip is markedly higher, and the right shoulder is markedly lower. Diversion from the sternum is also much more obvious. ImageEyes, teeth and ears, should ideally be perpendicular to the plumb line. Obviously, his torso is shifted to the left, and his head is tilted back to the right to compensate for the left torso shift. In just this sagittal plane view, this rider definitely has needs that extend beyond "Watts". How would a bike shop fit a bicyclist with these deviations?? Good Question! Now, let's approach this client from the coronal plain....Image Once again, we begin at the feet. The plumb line starts at the lateral malleolus, which is the "bump" on the outside of your ankle. Ideally, the plumb line should run through the hip joint, the shoulder joint, and right behind the earlobe. As you look at this photo, you can tell immediately that this client has shifted his entire center of gravity forward. Image Moving further up the frontal plane, the plumb line would ideally pass through the hip joint, and the chromium process. This individual instead, despite his perception that he is standing upright, is instead flattened in the lumbar region, is kyphotic in the thoracic region, and is body-weight forward. Unfortunately, as cyclists age, if they do not pay attention to these critical muscle groups along the back and spine, gravity has a tendency to 'win', due to positioning. Being over the handlebars is the same gravity strain as sitting over a keyboard, or driving in traffic. Musculo-skeletal diligence is required to maintain proper posture for effective propulsion, and this cyclist is already facing several form-induced performance handicaps. ImageLooking at the lateral, upper view of the frontal plane, the plumb line would again, ideally be located just behind the ears. This individual is about 8cm or more out of the plane, and look how the head juts forward almost beyond the torso. Image The final part of the posture analysis comes once again from the feet. Notice that in this individual, the right leg's vastus medialis (the thick muscle that you see when you pedal from 3 to 5 o'clock on a pedal stroke), almost touches the plumb line, while the left musculature is at least 2cm lower. The right foot is again forward, and there is very little development of the rider's soleus or gatrocnemius. This implies that the rider has been literally depending on too few muscle groups to perform the work necessary to propel a bike forward. ImageNow take a look at this image. Technically, this would be Scoliosis, but when a professional looks at the muscle imbalance and postural deviations in the trunk, one begins to think this is a Scoliosis of function rather than structure. In other words, this IS a musculo-skeletal imbalance that CAN be improved!!!! One of the most famous physio-therapists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, Pavel Kolar, says, "You may not be able to alter morphology, but you CAN live a pain-free life." This individual has unfortunately developed a number of muscular compensations to avoid previous episodes of pain which may have resulted from his injury and rehab that did not take an athlete's perspective. Image In this final photo of the Posture Analysis, the viewer can really see how the right shoulder of this cyclist is below the left. The spinous processes of the lower thoracic vertebrae are visible. This is often referred to as "Naked Spine", and it reveals where the Kyphosis is the most severe. You can see Scoliosis that is concave on the right. The head is also shifted left, but tilted right. From the epicenter of the trunk, even with a scoliotic spine, some of it should be on the plumb line. The fold of the scoop of the Supra-Iliac, reveals that the right side is also higher than the left. Not shown, but revealed during the assessment, was marked deltas in stride when Coach Kurt had the individual walk. Future videos of this individual will be taken to show gait imbalances which directly translates in to pedal stroke imbalances. Finally, it was revealed that this individual suffers fatigue in one leg over the other. Can the reader guess which one? Based on this assessment and overview, it shouldn't be too difficult to determine. With all this information in hand, Coach Kurt now has the ability to compare this to range of motion in all his joints. Video analysis of this individual on a stationary trainer and performing basic functional movement assesments further revealed that, in coach-speak, this athlete was "pedaling with one leg". The imbalanced power output, combined with the significant postural deviations, leave the coaches at Cycling Center Dallas with the impression that this individual is metaphorically 'riding down the road sideways'. One might think that this assessment leaves the athlete in a dire situation or with limited prognosis for improved Stamina, Strength, and Speed. BUT, NEVER UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF THE BODY TO ADAPT TO NEW STIMULI AND RETURN TOWARD AN OPTIMAL STATE! This individual has agreed to multiple training sessions with Coach Kurt which will focus exclusively on joint mobilization, flexibility and target strength training. Evidence is revealing that static, traditional resistance training methods may not be the best way to enhance posture, balance, or performance. THIS is the reason that I hired Coach Kurt when I was a Bike Gypsy, and it is the same reason that his knowledge is so valuable today. Cycling Center Dallas takes a Holistic Approach to Cycling Performance, and our professionals have over 60 years of combined experience to help you optimize your performance through an optimal body. It literally begins in the mind, and extends through to the tissue, the bone, the muscle, and the DESIRE. Let us help you, help yourself. Call Coach Kurt at either 214-533-2634, or email him at Kurt@cyclingcenterdallas.com to set up a free consultation. Technology, Application, Attention, Success. We focus on YOU.

Tags:
cyclingcenterdallas
15:30

Muenster Germanfest 2011 Testimonials

So where do I begin with this? The trip to the venue was fantastic and the event was..a challenge to put it sincerely. The start of the rally, which was 10 minutes after the hour of 11, was pretty normal. I would make a frantic dash towards the front in an attempt to keep out of the chaos of the starting pack. From there, I just held on to a pace I could manage. I honestly think I could have pushed a little harder, but with the views I got, I honestly didn’t want to. It looked spectacular, far more intriguing then the suburbs that I’ve lived in my life. That being said, the consequence of the scenery was the fact that the roads seem to snake with the surprisingly steep hills. As much as I hate loathe hills, I seem to hold up quite well to them. I ended up passing massive amounts of people (apparently the majority of them were for the 100 kilometer event) on the up hill portions of the event. Also, the reward was usually a pleasanter downhill which you could coast and hit 30 mph easily. (that being said, the fact that I way slightly more then a grain of sand helps) The only exception, and this is a BIG one, was when me and a few riders went down an EXTREMELY steep downhill section when i hit 37-40 mph and some one crosses over infront of me, consequently leading me to end up going off-roading on a ROAD bike at 37 MILES PER HOUR. Amazingly, I ended staying on two wheels perfectly and got back on the road. Honestly I was more upset at the fact that I lost so much speed and will now have to waste MORE energy on getting back up to pace. The whole event left me horrible shaken, for about 5 seconds at most, then I got over myself.  That and I got off my bike because there a hill that was WAY to steep to climb. managed to get 80 percent of the way before getting off my bike and walking it up the stupid hill. Did I mention that I hate hills. I’ve also noticed that I’m more motivated to move more quickly if someone passes or is at a speed I feel like reach. Point made, a van with a team name on it over took me on the other side of the road, and I increased my pace to keep up with him, weirdly enough. He even gave a nod of approval. The rally was tough, but I ended up learning so much about myself. Also, public bathrooms are still horrible, miserable boxes of dread. Avoid at all cost. That is all. Muenster was Great Fun! The winds were strong but not too strong and the hills were challenging. But the 4 months training with Richard in the studio completely prepared me for mastering the challenges with a feeling of success! The comraderie with 3 other classmates made the whole day one to remember with pride and a smile. Not to mention that decadent brat, beer and Texas tator to top it all off! Ahhhhhh! Alison, Vera, Peggy and I had a great time, and the training, particularly the anaerobic training, definitely helped on those steeper hills, so thanks! I heard you came in 11th overall-congrats!  The mix of training was much better this year than in the past. It has been more realistic than before. Muenster was fun. I did it in my own PR & cut out nearly 60 mins with all the rest stops included. We had a great time at the Muenster Germanfest Rally 2011!  Beautiful scenery, great company, a fabulous workout, and scrumptious beer and brats!  Every single one of us that traveled the hills and withstood the winds of Muenster were most definitely prepared for this journey because of our time in the cycling performance classes.   The interval training really paid off with the hills...one right after another...and our threshold work covered everything in between.  Although our group didn't do the 100k, I'm convinced we could have done it....maybe next year.  My stamina has improved from class especially on the rolling hills.  I felt as if I was in a "video game" of the computerized interval format used in the studio with you yelling to get "your speed up to 30" at the bottom of each hill!   Couldn't have done it without the studio work!
Had the best ride ever of course till the last mile when was struck by a bug in the eye.  The training helped me tremendously especially on the hills.  I passed so many people, especially the men.  Caught up with the Lawcar girls at a rest stop :)  Towards the end pulled a lot of the men to the finish.  It was wonderful.  Feel a lot for powerful.  Even received compliments about how well my pedal stroke was.  Not sure if that was sexual or not....lol!  Finished even doing the hills and wind at 18 miles an hour.  Very pleased with myself.  Thank you for the great training.  Still want to test out the crits but think I am more of a long distance rider than a racer....

Tags:
cyclingcenterdallas
13:50

MS150/164 Images from my own "Feisty Devils!"


Tags:
cyclingcenterdallas
14:27

MS150 reports coming in...

Completed thus far: Jim Kasle, Carlos Sepulveda, Rost Ginevich, Sally Nobleman, Anne Gogola, Shannon Miller, not sure if Christy McWilliams is with them or not. But Hats OFF to the riders who have completed the highest volume of cycling in their careers!

Tags:
cyclingcenterdallas
23:22

Congratulations to the Fab 5!

[caption id="attachment_119" align="alignnone" width="490" caption="Fab 5 Take on Muenster!"][/caption] And just look at those LEGS!!!! This quote says it best: "Wind was BRUTAL today, but we did have fun passing all those people who walked their bikes up the hills!" - Sally Nobleman.

Tags:
cyclingcenterdallas
18:01

CONGRATS STEPHEN SEPULVEDA!!!

[caption id="attachment_110" align="alignnone" width="489" caption="Sepulveda wins the sprint at Fair Park!"][/caption] Stephen Sepulveda, a student at the Cycling Center of Dallas, not only entered his first race... HE WON IT! Congratulations, Stephen, you've got a great career in a new sport to look forward to! BRAVO!

Tags: