Cycling Center Dallas Blog
Cycling Center Dallas Blog
Here we talk about all things cycling - training, wattage, group rides, bike rallies, triathlons, weather, coaching, coaches, nutrition, ponderings, musings, and equipment! If you have a topic or a question, send us a note and we'll try to answer for you!
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Tracy
16:10
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Functional Movement Summit Write up Part 5



Squatting

OK, I know some of you guys cringe at the thought of a squat. You may hate doing them because they IMG_0898are hard. You may hate doing them because you don’t have adequate hip mobility, or lack mobility in other areas that effects the movement chain. Both of these things can be fixed with a little work (well, actually that is only half true); they are always going to be hard if you are doing them right. However, there may be a third reason that that you dread squats, which is that you are just not built for them, and this is not something you can change.

Mike Boyle touched on this in his lecture and provided a reference, which inspired me to research it further. Although I was aware people had different pelvis and femur structures, it was always more of a vague afterthought for me. After seeing the evidence in pics and doing a little more research, I now have a clearer understanding of how bone structure of the hip and femur effects squatting ability.

Take a look at the two femurs in this picture. The structure of the heads are very differefemurnt. This causes them to fit into the hip sockets differently, and at different angles. The hip sockets of different individuals can also have very different structures. Here is a link to an article which was referenced in the lecture, which I think you will enjoy if you find this interesting:

http://themovementfix.com/the-best-kept-secret-why-people-have-to-squat-differently

So those who feel the need to squat with a wider stance, or with toes outward versus straight ahead, or are unable to go as deep as others, may have structural reasons behind these things that makes certain stances and variations a better choice for them; just something to consider.

Although I would still make it a priority to work on having good hip mobility and strong legs that can push weight and support you, we will also listen to what your body is telling you and let it guide you in doing squats in the best way for you.

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Tracy
13:56
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Functional Movement Summit Write up Part 4

The Sessions:

Eric Cressy: 10 years, 10 lessons: How to Perform Better in Training & Business

Mike Boyle: The new Functional Training for Sports Starts with Why? 

Eric Cressy and Mike Boyle are two of the biggest names in my industry, and I attended both of their lectures and hands-on sessions today. The IMG_0806combination they have of both scientific knowledge as well as understanding of what it takes to be a great trainer and a great coach is why they are among the few that rose to the top of their profession.


One of the biggest priorities I have when working with clients is fixing dysfunctional movement. If something is not functioning properly, there's no way you can build on top of it effectively, no matter what your goals are or what you're trying to do.
Getting to hear so many different people talk about the way they approach things helps me put a lot of tools in my toolbox. Coaching and training is a combination of an art and a science. Having the knowledge, and having been exposed to so many different ways of looking at a problem and breaking down what may be behind it is, is what I love about going to events like this. They give me more options in my toolbox to make use of, if the first (or second) approach doesn’t end up being as effective as we were hoping, or I might learn a differently way of explaining something that makes more sense to the person I am trying to explain it to. thumbnail_IMG_0808


If I can get somebody moving better, feeling better, and faster by doing the right things, by saying the right things, and by using the right systems, I can add more value to the experience of the session today, and provide something that they will take with them that
 may add to their quality of life long after they have walked out the door. And that is probably the most rewarding part of what I do.

I will share a few things I learned in Eric and Mike’s
sessions over the next few posts.

Flexibility and stretching 

“Stretching isn’t about today’s workout; it’s about preventing an injury six months down the road.“

This was taken from one of the IMG_0823_copyslides but I thought was a great quote. One of the controversies about stretching is that research has shown that stretching results in an increase in elasticity of the muscles for a period of time afterwards, and that has been shown to reduce power outputs in the range of 5-7%. This is the very reason I usually use a dynamic warm-up before training session and save the static stretching until afterwards.

However, Mike Boyle was adamant about this being a non-significant factor when the goal is long term movement abilities. He stated that the anti-stretch research is not compelling, and the health benefits far outweigh any short-term power reduction. I was glad to hear him voice this stance. He also included this comment in his lecture:

“Tightness of the anterior hip structures results in increased compressive loading to the facets during the push-off phase of the gait, since the femur cannot be brought back into hyperextension. Therefore, the lower extremity is placed behind the body by extending the pelvis under the lumbar spine”


Translation: If your hip flexor (the muscle you use to raise your leg up) is tight, your leg can’t extend back as far and your pelvis has to compensate for that, which in turn puts more stress on the lumbar back area it’s connected to.

I include both static stretches and movements that stretch the muscles by working them through full ranges of motion.  When working with some of my clients I could (and sometimes do) make an entire workout out of these stretches and movements.
The people with limited mobility have commented IMG_0831 on how hard they felt they were working during these sessions. I love to hear that, because I know they are getting a multitude of benefits out of the session, increased mobility being the priority. 

So, if you are someone who spends a lot of time at a desk or in a car for your job, take note.  There is a good chance you are starting to lose mobility in your upper T spine, hip flexors, and hamstrings.

I can show you some things to counter that, most of them needing minimal or no equipment and can be done anywhere.

Hearing the best of the best give information on what I am already doing is reassuring, but also keeps me on my path and reinforces the need to include both stretching and mobility work in the small group and private sessions I do with clients. Now I will confess I do, and have had a handful of clients that just do not need it.  In these cases, I don’t do much mobility work beyond recovery to work out some soreness, and we generally substitute stability work instead.


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